Hugh Reinbolt: Opinions and thoughts on emerging and cutting edge trends in technology, digital and social media that inspire me.

Wednesday, 31 March 2010

Vice Guide To Film: Mexican Narco Cinema Part 1 of 3

"Drugs we like 'em. Films we love 'em. Put 'em together - Narco Cinema."


Following on from my previous post about the 'Vice Guide To Film' series on VBS.TV, the first installment premiered yesterday; 'Mexican Narco Cinema Part 1 of 3'.


Shane Smith travels to Mexico to explore Narco Cinema; the film genre "where drugs meets film" and is essentially comprised of not only drugs, but woman, good cops, bad cops, drug dealers and of course trucks.


The documentary is an exploration of the foundations of Narco Cinema, where Shane Smith visits North Austin in Texas, which is a major distribution point for the micro-industry, to truly understand Narco Cinema; which is also known as 'Videohomes', as these movies are generally released straight to video / DVD. The stories of these B-Movies relate topically to what is going on in Mexico, both culturally and politically, involving drug cartels and police departments. Narco Cinema boasts inspiring titles such as 'Coca Inc', 'La Camioneta Gris', 'La Hummer Negra' and 'La Durango Roja'.

 

What is interesting is that the sign of success for these movies is in those that become franchises; some of which reach five or even six sequels.

Shane Smith also goes to Mexico City where he introduces the drug culture and the flow of narcotics between the US and Mexico. It is in Mexico City where Shane meets Jorge Reynoso (actor, director, writer, producer) who is a traditional Narco Cinema bad-guy and has starred in over 500 films. In Cuernavaca Shane meets another star; Mario Almada, who at 86 years old has starred in over 1000 films as a traditional good-guy. 'Vice Guide to Film' also profiles Rafael Caro Quintero, an infamous drug trafficker of the 1980s who was a major influence to the industry.


So, Narco Cinema, a "hyper-violent and sexy" celebration of drug traffickers -- who often finance these films -- which examines the relationships between the government and the drug cartels and the dark realities of Mexico. My Aunt is from Mexico, but she never seems to complain!


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1 comment:

  1. Hey vice, you should see a movie call 'El infierno'
    'the hell' http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NcwBWT2j_PY this movie show how as the difficult situations they go through many Mexicans are forced to became a mexican narco, its a great movie very fun, its not a shitty almada narco movie lol

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